http://www.engineeringnews.co.za
  SEARCH
Login
R/€ = 14.93Change: -0.04
R/$ = 13.30Change: 0.00
Au 1132.31 $/ozChange: -2.54
Pt 1012.00 $/ozChange: -8.00
 
 
Note: Search is limited to the most recent 250 articles. Set date range to access earlier articles.
Where? With... When?








Start
 
End
 
 
And must exclude these words...
Close Main Search
Close Main Login
My Profile News Alerts Newsletters Logout Close Main Profile
 
Agriculture   Automotive   Chemicals   Competition Policy   Construction   Defence   Economy   Electricity   Energy   Environment   ICT   Metals   Mining   Science and Technology   Services   Trade   Transport & Logistics   Water  
What's On Press Office Tenders Suppliers Directory Research Jobs Announcements Letters Contact Us
 
 
 
RSS Feed
Article   Comments   Other News   Research   Magazine  
 
 
Oct 29, 1999

Web access through cellphones on way

Back
Africa|Screen|Screens|Siemens|Wireless|Africa|Services
Africa|Screen|Screens|Siemens|Wireless|Africa|Services
africa-company|screen|screens|siemens|wireless|africa|services
© Reuse this The advent of wireless applications protocol (Wap), which will soon change cellphones from voice- transmission to data-transmission communication tools, is being regarded as the solution to bringing Internet connectivity to the mass market.

With the country’s total number of Internet dial-up subscribers, or actual home-users, being a mere 558 000, it is clear there is a need to bring the Internet closer to home for many South Africans.

The reason for this low number of subscribers is evident: many people do not have access to the Internet at work or at home, while others simply cannot afford computers and the required software.

However, with about 2,4-million South Africans subscribing to cellphones, the groundwork has already been laid to take these masses into the next era, where a mobile phone is soon to become the only link between the user and the World Wide Web.

“The Wap solution is the key in providing interconnectivity to the mass market in places such as Africa and Asia, where cellular users far out number Internet users,” says Gary Cousins of Siemens Information and Communication Networks.

“With the right handset, you will not need computer hardware for Internet browsing,” he says.

A simple example that illustrates the practical implication of Wap is that everyone with a cellphone can now have an e-mail address, without the necessity of owning or having access to a computer.

Once a personal e-mail address is accessed, unread e-mail messages will be forwarded as text to the Wap-compatible cellphone.

The user will be able to reply to the sender by typing in a written message on the cellular handset.

“The cellular handset is used to dial into the Internet server via the wireless mark-up language, a specific language for wireless applications which allows the network operator to release Web information in a modified format, which is then displayed on the cellular handset,” says Cousins.

However, the cellular handset will not be able to carry the Web-page format complete with pictures and special effects.

Information will be downloaded from the relevant site, and displayed almost like a stack of cards.

Once the user has identified a certain option, the screen will display the next set of options, until the relevant information has been downloaded in a brief and clear summarised format.

There will be no need to scroll down screens full of complicated inst ructions or irrelevant information, which saves the user cellular airtime.

To illustrate this, one can, for example, dial into the World Cup Rugby Web site by typing in the words ‘World Cup Rugby’.

A range of options will appear on the screen, such as specific matches, venues, players, match statistics, and half-time and final scores.

The required information will appear on your screen instantly by continuing to select specific options.

Other Wap-compatible services include the retrieval of news headlines, traffic and weather reports, and Internet banking.

“One can imagine the potential Wap holds for future wireless mobile applications, but it would be unrealistic to expect that this technology will influence the mass market in a revolutionary way within the next eight to 12 months,” says Cousins.

“And, of course, Wap will not come cheap,” he warns.

“First you have to have the right cellular handset, then the additional airtime spent on the handset will also add an extra couple of hundred rands on to your phone bill every month – depending on how often you use the Wap Internet browsing facility,” he says.

Siemens has been the first to conduct its own Wap trial in South Africa, and will be launching Wap early next year after the Wap Gateway has been installed and tested on the cellular network.

The Wap Gateway enables information to pass through from the Internet to the cellular network, and on to the cellular handsets of the end-users.

Edited by: System Author
© Reuse this Comment Guidelines (150 word limit)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other Information Technology News
Although the Tshimologong digital precinct in Braamfontein, Johannesburg, is just one of the city’s districts dedicated to economic and social development, it aims to use information and communication technology (ICT) to help solve social and economic problems in...
MARAIS VAN HEERDEN The owner/operator should be able to view the overall project design and progress made at any time
Three-dimensional (3D) engineering design models can now be viewed on tablets, which enable stakeholders to view the design without having to buy the design software used to create it, says engineering design firm 3DDraughting executive Marais van Heerden. The...
Peter Jones Electronic Equipment, a division of the Actum group recently supplied two IV series vision sensors to the Port Elizabeth-based Mobile Emissions Catalyst division of Germany-based chemicals company BASF, says Actum technical sales manager Rob Howes, who...
More
 
 
Latest News
A preliminary investigation by the Railway Safety Regulator (RSR) into the derailment of a Shosholoza Meyl train in Kimberley earlier this month, found that Transnet Freight Rail (TFR) had failed to communicate with the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)...
Three of home improvement company Illiad’s major shareholders – Sanlam, Visio and Coronation, which held 69.25% – have agreed to vote in favour of a takeover by Steinhoff, with the company’s remaining shareholders to vote on the deal on September 29. Seventy-five per...
Government should face the fact that South Africa’s full-blown jobs crisis is a matter of urgent public importance, the Democratic Alliance (DA) said on Friday. MP James Vos, the DA shadow minister of tourism, was responding to a letter by Baleka Mbete, the Speaker...
More
 
 
Recent Research Reports
Defence 2015: A review of South Africa's defence sector (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Coal 2015 report examines South Africa’s coal industry with regards to the business environment, the key participants in the sector, local demand, export sales and coal logistics, projects being undertaken by the large and smaller participants in the...
Real Economy Year Book 2015 (PDF Report)
There are very few beacons of hope on South Africa’s economic horizon. Economic growth is weak, unemployment is rising, electricity supply is insufficient to meet demand and/or spur growth, with poor prospects for many of the commodities mined and exported. However,...
Real Economy Insight: Automotive 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book comprises separate reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
Real Economy Insight: Water 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book has been divided into individual reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, coal, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
Real Economy Insight: Construction 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book has been divided into individual reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, coal, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
Real Economy Insight: Electricity 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book has been divided into individual reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, coal, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
 
 
 
 
 
This Week's Magazine
Training company The Intelligence Transfer Centre will host the fourth yearly Environmental Crimes Conference at the Indaba Hotel, in Fourways, Johannesburg between September 9 and 10. Confirmed key regulatory bodies that will attend the event include the Department...
The government of Egypt has said it is ready to provide technical assistance to Malawi in the development of the Shire–Zambezi waterway, which is designed to link landlocked Malawi to the Indian Ocean by opening the two rivers for navigation. Egyptian ambassador to...
Kenya is finally set to start building a new multipurpose petroleum pipeline, after securing a $350-loan from a consortium of banks, including South Africa's Rand Merchant Bank. The other banks in the consortium are the Cooperative Bank of Kenya, Citibank's Kenya...
MARAIS VAN HEERDEN The owner/operator should be able to view the overall project design and progress made at any time
Three-dimensional (3D) engineering design models can now be viewed on tablets, which enable stakeholders to view the design without having to buy the design software used to create it, says engineering design firm 3DDraughting executive Marais van Heerden. The...
Ford’s newest offering in a long list of newcomers to the local market in the last two years is the B-Max multi-activity vehicle (MAV). The B-Max will play in the so called B-MAV segment, or the small MAV segment, currently dominated by Toyota’s Avanza, which sells...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alert Close
Embed Code Close
content
Research Reports Close
Research Reports are a product of the
Research Channel Africa. Reports can be bought individually or you can gain full access to all reports as part of a Research Channel Africa subscription.
Find Out More Buy Report
 
 
Close
Engineering News
Completely Re-Engineered
Experience it now. Click here
*website to launch in a few weeks
Subscribe Now for $96 Close
Subscribe Now for $96