R/€ = 15.25Change: 0.18
R/$ = 13.52Change: 0.23
Au 1147.42 $/ozChange: 12.66
Pt 935.00 $/ozChange: 24.50
Note: Search is limited to the most recent 250 articles. Set date range to access earlier articles.
Where? With... When?

And must exclude these words...
Close Main Search
Close Main Login
My Profile News Alerts Newsletters Logout Close Main Profile
Agriculture   Automotive   Chemicals   Competition Policy   Construction   Defence   Economy   Electricity   Energy   Environment   ICT   Metals   Mining   Science and Technology   Services   Trade   Transport & Logistics   Water  
What's On Press Office Tenders Suppliers Directory Research Jobs Announcements Letters About Us
RSS Feed
Article   Comments   Other News   Research   Magazine  
Oct 23, 2012

Tshwane ready to roll out BRT system with nostalgic station design

Cape Town|Construction|Johannesburg|Tshwane|Design|PROJECT|Roads|System|Systems|transport|STATION DESIGN|Service|Services|Systems|Lungile Madlala|Operations
© Reuse this

The 7 km, Phase 1A leg of the Tshwane bus rapid transit (BRT) system, running from the innercity to Hatfield, is on track to open in April 2014, says City of Tshwane strategic executive director transport Lungile Madlala.

Phase 1B, from Hatfield to Menlyn, and Phase 1C, from the central business district (CBD) to Rainbow Junction, will open its doors in June 2015, she adds.

The entire BRT system as it is currently planned will start operations in June 2016, and will link Kopanong, in the north-west of Tshwane, to Denneboom, in the north-east, following an u-shaped route, traversing the inner city.

The 56 km of trunk route, featuring BRT buses in dedicated lanes stopping at dedicated stations, will run from Wonderboom to Menlyn, with passengers delivered to trunk route stations using complementary or feeder routes.

“This is the scope of the system based on our current funding model,” notes Madlala. “We have secured R2.5-billion in funding from national government over the next three years.”

“In some cases we will be taking lanes from existing roads to create the bus service, and in some cases we will build new lanes,” she adds.

“We aim to minimise the amount of expropriations that have to be done.”

Madlala says current planning is for Tshwane BRT buses to run at a frequency of three to five minutes during peak periods, with the feeder, or complementary services, operating at 15-minute intervals.

Off-peak intervals on the trunk routes will be around 15 to 20 minutes.

It’s expected that Phase 1A of the system will ramp up to 7 800 passengers a day, with the final system running at 136 000 passenger trips a day in 2018.

The Tshwane BRT will make use of 18 m articulated buses with the capacity to carry 90 people, and 12 m buses carrying 60 people.

“We have reduced the standing capacity on the buses because of what we believe will be long journey times,” notes Madlala.

The Tshwane council had already gone out on tender for its requirement of 154 buses, but had to retract the tender.

If the council uses funding from government – “public money” – to buy the buses, then, by law, “we must own it”, explains Madlala. “And we don’t want to.”

The plan is to establish a private bus operating company which will operate the BRT system, and which will also own the buses.

The bus tender will be reissued soon, says Madlala.

As with all other BRT systems countrywide, the minibus taxi industry has to become an active participant in the city’s new bus operating company.

“We have not started negotiations with taxi operators yet, but we have had several briefings already.  We are currently verifying who the taxi owners are who will be affected by the implementation of the BRT system,” says Madlala.

“We, as the city, have a good relationship with the taxi industry.”

Tshwane has already put in place a special purpose vehicle company, managed by a group of trustees, to acquire the buses for the eventual bus operator.

“We cannot wait. We have to start the process now already,” notes Madlala.

Other than the City of Johannesburg’s BRT system, which uses raised platform stations, Tshwane has opted for the more familiar low-entry buses, with the station floor at 340 mm, instead of the 940 mm seen in Johannesburg.

The City of Tshwane chose two designs for the stations, following an architectural competition, says Madlala.

Memory Box concept stations will be located within the city on Paul Kruger street. They will include imagery and information related to the historic buildings surrounding them.

The Retro-Tram design will be used for the stations located outside the CBD. The concept is intended to evoke the imagery of the city’s historical tram lines, realised in a modern style.

Madlala adds that payment on the BRT system will be by smartcard, and should be compatible with other public transport smartcard systems.

Operating hours will be 05:30 to 20:30.

It’s expected that the BRT project will create 10 000 construction jobs, and 1 000 new permanent jobs, such as call centre operators, station personnel and bus drivers.

“We envisage closed-circuit television to cover the entire route, as well as urban traffic control, which will allow the BRT buses to only encounter green traffic lights along the route,” adds Madlala.

It is expected that the name for the Tshwane BRT system will be announced at the end of November, following a nomination process from the various communities within the city.

As for ticket prices – the last number outstanding still – Madlala says she can currently only confirm “that the BRT system will be subsidised and affordable”.

As for the overall goal of the BRT, Madlala says it is hoped the system will transform Tshwane in terms of urban development, especially by encouraging densification in suburbs, as opposed to the continued spread of neighbourhoods currently seen into an ever-increasing geographical area.

Nonmotorised transport will also gain a prominent role in the city through the implementation of the BRT system, as its development will allow for the expansion pedestrian areas, as well as the establishment of cycle routes.

“The system must be convenient, safe, reliable, affordable and attractive, otherwise it won’t get people out of their cars,” notes Madlala.

She acknowledges that the construction of Tshwane’s BRT system has been delayed, and that it should have originally been up and running in 2010, in time for the World Cup, but adds that the city is now, at least, left with “the last mover advantage”, in that it can learn from the mistakes made in the implementation of BRT systems in Johannesburg and Cape Town.

The Tshwane bus service is not “providing the level of service the city needs”, says Madlala, who started in her position in April this year, following her previous job as City of Tshwane strategic executive director roads.

“We are currently doing a technical study to see how the Tshwane bus service can best fit into the BRT system. Can it serve as a feeder system, or must it form part of the BRT operator?”


Edited by: Creamer Media Reporter
© Reuse this Comment Guidelines (150 word limit)
Other Automotive News
Chris de Kock
Almost one year after the Nigerian Automotive Council and WesBank signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) for the South African group to enter the Nigerian market, WesBank is yet to finance a vehicle purchase. WesBank had an “optimistic objective” to write its...
Volkswagen's supervisory board will hold an extraordinary meeting on Wednesday at which finance chief Hans Dieter Poetsch is expected to be appointed as new head of the 20-member controlling panel, two sources said on Sunday. Europe's biggest carmaker faces the worst...
All Volkswagen models affected by the emissions scandal in the US complied with South African emissions standards, said Volkswagen Group South Africa (VWSA) on Monday. As the emissions standards were much lower in South Africa (Euro 2) than in Europe (Euro 5) and the...
Latest News
Updated 4 hours ago The Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) has called on governments to introduce legislation that puts a stop to the construction of new coal plants, stating that coal consumption needed to be phased out completely by 2050, or earlier. The international nongovernmental...
Updated 5 hours ago The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has again lowered its growth outlook for South Africa for 2015, projecting in its October World Economic Outlook (WEO) that the economy would expand by only 1.4% this year and 1.3% in 2016. The forecasts represent a 0.6 and a 0.8...
Minister Thulas Nxesi
Updated 5 hours ago There are still many opportunities for South Africa’s black high school learners to find jobs in future, both in the public and private sectors, provided that the learners apply discipline and commitment to study, Public Works Minister Thulas Nxesi said on Tuesday....
Recent Research Reports
Liquid Fuels 2015: A review of South Africa's liquid fuels sector (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Liquid Fuels 2015 Report examines these issues in the context of South Africa’s business environment; oil and gas exploration; fuel pricing; the development of the country’s biofuels industry; the logistics of transporting liquid fuels; and...
Road and Rail 2015: A review of South Africa's road and rail sectors (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Road and Rail 2015 report examines South Africa’s road and rail transport system, with particular focus on the size and state of the country’s road and rail infrastructure and network, the funding and maintenance of these respective networks, and...
Defence 2015: A review of South Africa's defence sector (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Coal 2015 report examines South Africa’s coal industry with regards to the business environment, the key participants in the sector, local demand, export sales and coal logistics, projects being undertaken by the large and smaller participants in the...
Real Economy Year Book 2015 (PDF Report)
There are very few beacons of hope on South Africa’s economic horizon. Economic growth is weak, unemployment is rising, electricity supply is insufficient to meet demand and/or spur growth, with poor prospects for many of the commodities mined and exported. However,...
Real Economy Insight: Automotive 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book comprises separate reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
Real Economy Insight: Water 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book has been divided into individual reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, coal, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
This Week's Magazine
Sphere Holdings CEO Itumeleng Kgaboesele
Black-owned investment holding company Sphere Holdings plans to raise a further R1-billion in the coming months in support of its strategy to become a leading black industrial enterprise, which could ultimately seek a listing on the JSE.
Energy analyst and EE Publishers MD Chris Yelland warned recently against excessive optimism regarding timescales for the proposed construction of new nuclear power plants (NPPs) in South Africa. He was speaking at a Nuclear Roundtable in Johannesburg. “I think we...
Malawi’s Lilongwe Water Board (LWB) is inviting eligible bidders to prequalify for the board’s efficiency improvement works, which will be implemented as part of the E24-million Lilongwe Water Resources Efficiency Programme.   LWB CEO Alfonso Chikuni explains that...
CROATIA, AN EU MEMBER BUT NOT A TDCA MEMBER On July 1, 2013, Croatia officially became the twenty-eighth member of the European Union (EU). Despite Croatia’s accession into the EU, it is yet to become party to the Trade, Development and Cooperation Agreement (TDCA)...
The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) has announced that its new Inundu airborne electronics testing, evaluation and training pod had made its first test flight on September 10. The successful flight was undertaken from Lanseria International...
Alert Close
Embed Code Close
Research Reports Close
Research Reports are a product of the
Research Channel Africa. Reports can be bought individually or you can gain full access to all reports as part of a Research Channel Africa subscription.
Find Out More Buy Report
Engineering News
Completely Re-Engineered
Experience it now. Click here
*website to launch in a few weeks
Subscribe Now for $96 Close
Subscribe Now for $96