http://www.engineeringnews.co.za
  SEARCH
Login
R/€ = 15.10Change: 0.02
R/$ = 13.45Change: 0.01
Au 1132.97 $/ozChange: -2.52
Pt 1013.00 $/ozChange: -3.00
 
 
Note: Search is limited to the most recent 250 articles. Set date range to access earlier articles.
Where? With... When?








Start
 
End
 
 
And must exclude these words...
Close Main Search
Close Main Login
My Profile News Alerts Newsletters Logout Close Main Profile
 
Agriculture   Automotive   Chemicals   Competition Policy   Construction   Defence   Economy   Electricity   Energy   Environment   ICT   Metals   Mining   Science and Technology   Services   Trade   Transport & Logistics   Water  
What's On Press Office Tenders Suppliers Directory Research Jobs Announcements Letters Contact Us
 
 
 
RSS Feed
Article   Comments   Other News   Research   Magazine  
 
 
Jan 27, 2012

Real-time, deep-packet inspection of network traffic improves security

Back
Africa|Environment|SECURITY|Africa|Services|Solutions
Africa|Environment|SECURITY|Africa|Services|Solutions
africa-company|environment|security|africa|services|solutions
© Reuse this



The real-time, deep-layer inspection of inbound, outbound and internal network traffic enables companies to improve the security of their information and also to secure information accessed remotely by different devices, says firewall supplier SonicWall director of emerging markets and Europe, Middle East and Africa distributors Dominique Honnay.

The information technology administrator or security officer of a company needs to be able to identify the applications coming into the company’s network, he says.

“We look at the special characteristics of data streams and, based on these, we can determine that the traffic is LinkedIn, Facebook, Facebook Farmville gaming, or Skype, beside others. Our library has a database of 3 800 applications that we can identify and it is growing continuously,” he explains.

All incoming traffic should be scanned and filtered, as is the case with classic Unified Threat Management Solutions (intrusion prevention services, gateway antivirus and antispyware). However, there is a growing need to scan the traffic from specific applications in detail, owing to emerging security threats. This means scanning streaming media, such as Skype, YouTube and Voice-over-Internet Protocols (VoIPs). Also, when companies are using cloud applications, it is critical to ensure a secure network envi- ronment, he says.

“This must happen in real time, as the information is streamed. We have developed our own patented technology, called Reassembly-Free Deep Packet Inspection (RFDPI), to scan network traffic. This engine gives us the ability to scan up to 56 different protocols, including secure hypertext trans- fer protocol and other secure traffic,” he notes.

“One of the things we do is to look for anomalies in the packets. For example, session initiation protocol and VoIP have distinguishing characteristics. We also use our own intelligence database to identify potential threats coming into the network through, for example, VoIP, and we define the patterns that the engine can recognise in the VoIP traffic coming into companies,” explains Honnay.

Companies traditionally focus on securing and filtering information coming from outside into the networks. However, in larger, more open environments, such as in large corporate companies and universi- ties, it is also important to subsegment the internal network in different virtual or physical areas and conduct scans and filtering for internal traffic on the network, he notes.

Meanwhile, given that some employees must be able to access different sites, such as Facebook or LinkedIn, to establish and maintain client relationships, simply blocking access to sites is not the most effective method of dealing with the emerging security threats in the workplace.

Rules for bandwidth prioritisation can be set up to manage the performance of a company’s network because there will always be a greater demand for bandwidth than is available, he adds.

“From a secure remote access point of view, we also must be able to identify which users are accessing our networks, using which applications and what devices. Is the device known to the company, is it a private device, does it have the correct firewall settings and is its antivirus program up to date?”

Employees and managers need to be able to connect to work networks using any device at hand and the critical measure is how companies control this development, states Honnay.

The mechanisms to manage device connectivity mostly have to do with the internal environment, which means that the user must register and authenticate the device on the active directory database, including his or her position in, or relationship with, the company, for example, a consultant.

“Secondly, we have to check the device he or she is using and whether it is a managed or unmanaged device. Can the information technology (IT) manager configure or see the security settings?”

SonicWall’s Secure Remote Access Platforms can check to see if devices are secure and can prevent flooding, which is mass traffic sent to bring down a server or network.

“We can define, for instance, when a person wants to connect with a device that does not meet the company’s security policy; they can only access browser-based applications, and will only be granted full access to the internal network if the user has taken action to secure his device,” he says.

The challenge, if a company wants to effectively secure traffic on its network, is to be able to scan at wire speeds.

“If you cannot scan at 1 Gbit/s, 5 Gbit/s, 40 Gbit/s or higher, you are securing the environment at the cost of performance. There must be a balance between connec- tivity, security and performance.

“We have RFDPI appliances capable of handling 10 Gbit/s and can combine four boxes to enable 40 Gbit/s scanning. We plan to increase this capacity in 2012.”

Meanwhile, SonicWall has identified a potential growth market in South Africa in line with developments in the US and Europe, where smaller companies that are unable to afford skilled or permanent IT security personnel are outsourcing the perimeter security of their networks to specialist companies.

“This is a change in the market that will probably come to South Africa as well,” concludes Honnay.

Edited by: Martin Zhuwakinyu
Creamer Media Senior Deputy Editor
© Reuse this Comment Guidelines (150 word limit)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other News This Week News
Training company The Intelligence Transfer Centre will host the fourth yearly Environmental Crimes Conference at the Indaba Hotel, in Fourways, Johannesburg between September 9 and 10. Confirmed key regulatory bodies that will attend the event include the Department...
The government of Egypt has said it is ready to provide technical assistance to Malawi in the development of the Shire–Zambezi waterway, which is designed to link landlocked Malawi to the Indian Ocean by opening the two rivers for navigation. Egyptian ambassador to...
Kenya is finally set to start building a new multipurpose petroleum pipeline, after securing a $350-loan from a consortium of banks, including South Africa's Rand Merchant Bank. The other banks in the consortium are the Cooperative Bank of Kenya, Citibank's Kenya...
More
 
 
Latest News
Implats CEO Terence Goodlace
Updated 54 minutes ago Platinum mining major Impala Platinum (Implats) said on Thursday that it intended raising up to R4-billion through the sale of new Implats ordinary shares using an accelerated bookbuild process. The company, headed by CEO Terence Goodlace, said that shareholder...
Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa
Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa said on Wednesday that his attempts to improve the efficiency of South Africa's state-owned entities (SOEs) are not an attempt to get more votes in the 2016 Local Government Elections. He was updating the National Council of Provinces...
Frost & Sullivan ICT programme manager Gareth Mellon
It is increasingly widely accepted that deploying information and communication technology (ICT) infrastructure will bring about a surge in economic growth across Africa. However, the sourcing of billions of dollars required to deliver universal coverage was up for...
More
 
 
Recent Research Reports
Road and Rail 2015: A review of South Africa's road and rail sectors (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Road and Rail 2015 report examines South Africa’s road and rail transport system, with particular focus on the size and state of the country’s road and rail infrastructure and network, the funding and maintenance of these respective networks, and...
Defence 2015: A review of South Africa's defence sector (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Coal 2015 report examines South Africa’s coal industry with regards to the business environment, the key participants in the sector, local demand, export sales and coal logistics, projects being undertaken by the large and smaller participants in the...
Real Economy Year Book 2015 (PDF Report)
There are very few beacons of hope on South Africa’s economic horizon. Economic growth is weak, unemployment is rising, electricity supply is insufficient to meet demand and/or spur growth, with poor prospects for many of the commodities mined and exported. However,...
Real Economy Insight: Automotive 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book comprises separate reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
Real Economy Insight: Water 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book has been divided into individual reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, coal, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
Real Economy Insight: Construction 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book has been divided into individual reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, coal, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
 
 
 
 
 
This Week's Magazine
Training company The Intelligence Transfer Centre will host the fourth yearly Environmental Crimes Conference at the Indaba Hotel, in Fourways, Johannesburg between September 9 and 10. Confirmed key regulatory bodies that will attend the event include the Department...
The government of Egypt has said it is ready to provide technical assistance to Malawi in the development of the Shire–Zambezi waterway, which is designed to link landlocked Malawi to the Indian Ocean by opening the two rivers for navigation. Egyptian ambassador to...
Kenya is finally set to start building a new multipurpose petroleum pipeline, after securing a $350-loan from a consortium of banks, including South Africa's Rand Merchant Bank. The other banks in the consortium are the Cooperative Bank of Kenya, Citibank's Kenya...
MARAIS VAN HEERDEN The owner/operator should be able to view the overall project design and progress made at any time
Three-dimensional (3D) engineering design models can now be viewed on tablets, which enable stakeholders to view the design without having to buy the design software used to create it, says engineering design firm 3DDraughting executive Marais van Heerden. The...
Ford’s newest offering in a long list of newcomers to the local market in the last two years is the B-Max multi-activity vehicle (MAV). The B-Max will play in the so called B-MAV segment, or the small MAV segment, currently dominated by Toyota’s Avanza, which sells...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alert Close
Embed Code Close
content
Research Reports Close
Research Reports are a product of the
Research Channel Africa. Reports can be bought individually or you can gain full access to all reports as part of a Research Channel Africa subscription.
Find Out More Buy Report
 
 
Close
Engineering News
Completely Re-Engineered
Experience it now. Click here
*website to launch in a few weeks
Subscribe Now for $96 Close
Subscribe Now for $96