http://www.engineeringnews.co.za
  SEARCH
Login
R/€ = 14.32Change: -0.15
R/$ = 11.05Change: -0.08
Au 1231.75 $/ozChange: -1.17
Pt 1369.00 $/ozChange: -1.50
 
 
Note: Search is limited to the most recent 250 articles. Set date range to access earlier articles.
Where? With... When?








Start
 
End
 
 
And must exclude these words...
Close Main Search
Close Main Login
My Profile News Alerts Newsletters Logout Close Main Profile
 
Agriculture   Automotive   Chemicals   Competition Policy   Construction   Defence   Economy   Electricity   Energy   Environment   ICT   Metals   Mining   Science and Technology   Services   Trade   Transport & Logistics   Water  
What's On Press Office Tenders Suppliers Directory Research Jobs Announcements Contact Us
 
 
 
RSS Feed
Article   Comments   Other News   Research   Magazine  
 
 
Sep 02, 2005

How ships are handled

Back
Cape Town|DURBAN|Harbour|Port|Africa|Marine|Marine Services|Ports|Safety|Africa|South Africa|Infrastructure Management|Towage Services|Natinal Ports Authority|Infrastructure|Tsietsi Mokhele
Harbour|Port|Africa|Marine|Ports|Safety|Africa||||Infrastructure|
cape-town|durban|harbour|port|africa-company|marine|marine-services-company|ports|safety|africa|south-africa|infrastructure-management|towage-services|natinal-ports-authority|infrastructure|tsietsi-mokhele
© Reuse this Marine Services is of crucial importance to the South African economy.

It is one of four divisions of the Natinal Ports Authority’s (NPA’s) Maritime Services, the others being Lighthouse Services, Ship-repair Services, and Dredging Services.

In turn, Maritime Services is one of the two main businesses of the NPA, the other being Landlord Services; while Landlord Services is responsible for the NPA’s ‘landside’ operations – property and infrastructure management – Maritime Services is responsible for ‘waterside’ operations.

Lighthouse Services, Ship-repair Services and Dredging Services are pretty self-explanatory in their titles; Marine Services, however, has two main elements – marine operations and the office of the harbourmaster.

“Marine operations is the business of assisting ships to move in, out, and around our harbours – the actual shiphandling; we do this through towage services (tugs), pilotage and berthing services,” elucidates Marine Services executive manager Tsietsi Mokhele.

While the tugs physically manoeuvre the ships by towing or pushing, pilots take control of the ships and guide them into and out of port, and berthing services comprise the quayside teams which moor and unmoor the ships.

In all, Marine Services employs about 1 068 people.

“Our biggest technical skills area is pilotage – we have 72 pilot posts countrywide, and there are six different categories of pilotage licence, from ‘entry’ to ‘unrestricted’,” he states.

To move from the first ‘entry’ category to the fifth (the one below ‘unrestricted’) takes a minimum of four years.

“There is no direct entry for pilots – the career path is cadet, tugmaster, then pilot,” he points out.

“Again, there are different categories of tugmaster, and to be a qualified tugmaster you need to have four years’ experience,” he adds.

While there is only one licence for tugmaster, the profession is subdivided in terms of the size of the tug they may command, with junior tugmasters commanding the smallest tugs and senior tugmasters the largest (Marine Services currently has a fleet of 24 tugs, divided into three categories).

There are 68 tugmaster positions in the country.

“As more and more larger ships are calling at our ports we need bigger tugs, commanded by senior tugmasters, so there are greater and greater burdens on our senior tugmasters, and junior tugmasters are less required,” Mokhele reveals.

“So we are doing a lot of training,” he highlights.

The tugs also need engineers.

“We have 68 chief marine engineers and, by law, one must be on every tug at all times,” explains Mokhele.

The chief marine engineers are assisted by (junior) marine engineers. The engineer career path can lead, after the chief engineer grade, to technical management and then management.

“The office of the harbour master is responsible for safety, for aids to navigation (like buoys), for vessel traffic services (the nautical equivalent of air-traffic control) and for port control,” reports Mokhele.

Each port has a harbour master (previously called a port captain), supported by one or more deputy harbour masters (Durban and Cape Town each have three deputy harbour masters), with a chief harbour master heading the national office.

“We have one chief harbour master and seven harbour masters in South Africa,” he states.
Edited by: Keith Campbell
© Reuse this Comment Guidelines (150 word limit)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other Transport & Logistics News
The board of UD Trucks Southern Africa (UDTSA) has announced the resignation of MD Jacques Carelse.   Long-time UD employee, corporate planning and marketing GM, Rory Schulz, has been appointed as acting MD while the process started to appoint a new MD. The Japanese...
The South African new truck market is too small to justify increasing local content on vehicles assembled locally, says Toyota South Africa Motors (TSAM) president and CEO Dr Johan van Zyl. Van Zyl is also president of the National Association of Automobile...
EDUCATION DRIVER Transnet Engineering is passionate about the learning and development of youth and is continuously investing in its technical skills pipeline
State-owned freight and logistics group Transnet Engineering (TE) says its membership and association with nonprofit technical organisation the Southern African Institute of Welding (SAIW), has ensured that all TE’s welding inspectors have been correctly trained and...
More
 
 
Latest News
State-owned power utility Eskom starts its 100-day countdown for the first power from the first 794 MW Medupi power station unit on Monday September 15, with Unit 6 scheduled to be synchronised at midday on December 24. Synchronisation is the process whereby the...
Trade union Uasa says the recent fragile performance of the mining and manufacturing sectors is not only the result of protracted strikes across both sectors, which resulted in a “massive” reduction in export figures, but can also be attributed to inadequate...
Tremendous innovation is under way in Africa, with people shifting their perceptions of what to expect from the continent, says South African trends analyst, Dion Chang. He told the seventh annual Green Building Convention, in Cape Town, that a wave of innovation...
More
 
 
Recent Research Reports
Road and Rail 2014: A review of South Africa's road and rail infrastructure (PDF report)
Creamer Media’s Road and Rail 2014 report examines South Africa’s road and rail transport system, with particular focus on the size and state of the country’s road and rail network, the funding and maintenance of these respective networks, and the push to move road...
Real Economy Year Book 2014 (PDF Report)
This edition drills down into the performance and outlook for a variety of sectors, including automotive, construction, electricity, transport, steel, water, coal, gold, iron-ore and platinum.
Real Economy Insight: Automotive 2014 (PDF Report)
This four-page brief covers key developments in the automotive industry over the past 12 months, including an overview of South Africa’s automotive market, trade figures, production and the policies influencing the sector.
Real Economy Insight: Construction 2014 (PDF Report)
This five-page brief covers key developments in the construction industry over the past 12 months. It provides an overview of the sector and includes details of employment in the sector, infrastructure and municipal spending, as well as insight into companies’...
Real Economy Insight: Electricity 2014 (PDF Report)
This five-page brief covers key developments in the electricity industry over the past 12 months, including details of State-owned power utility Eskom’s generation activities, funding and tariffs, independent power producers and prospects for the sector.
Real Economy Insight: Road and Rail 2014 (PDF Report)
This six-page brief covers key developments in the road and rail industries over the past 12 months, including details of South Africa’s road and rail network and prospects for both sectors.
 
 
 
 
 
This Week's Magazine
The board of UD Trucks Southern Africa (UDTSA) has announced the resignation of MD Jacques Carelse.   Long-time UD employee, corporate planning and marketing GM, Rory Schulz, has been appointed as acting MD while the process started to appoint a new MD. The Japanese...
There is a need to start planning another pumped storage scheme in South Africa. Much work has already been done at a site in the Limpopo province and the project was very close to being put out to tender at one stage. In 2008/9 the National Energy Regulator of South...
The Coega Development Corporation (CDC) is preparing to leverage its strategic coastal position to develop the Eastern Cape economy through proposed aquaculture development zones (ADZs), with a proposed R2-billion project aiming to contribute $278-million to the...
Completion of the ongoing construction of the 102 km Zomba–Jali–Phalombe–Chitakale road, in southern Malawi, has been extended from June  to December 15 because of persistent rains and difficulties in paying the contractor. The project is being undertaken by Kuwait's...
The Malawi government has awarded South African firm  Fischer Consortium the  contract to upgrade the Malawi Road Traffic Information System. The Directorate of Road Traffic and Safety Services at Malawi's Ministry of Transport and Public Works says Fischer...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alert Close
Embed Code Close
content
Research Reports Close
Research Reports are a product of the
Research Channel Africa. Reports can be bought individually or you can gain full access to all reports as part of a Research Channel Africa subscription.
Find Out More Buy Report
 
 
Close
Engineering News
Completely Re-Engineered
Experience it now. Click here
*website to launch in a few weeks