http://www.engineeringnews.co.za
  SEARCH
Login
R/€ = 13.69Change: -0.05
R/$ = 12.32Change: -0.01
Au 1168.78 $/ozChange: -0.02
Pt 1083.00 $/ozChange: 1.00
 
 
Note: Search is limited to the most recent 250 articles. Set date range to access earlier articles.
Where? With... When?








Start
 
End
 
 
And must exclude these words...
Close Main Search
Close Main Login
My Profile News Alerts Newsletters Logout Close Main Profile
 
Agriculture   Automotive   Chemicals   Competition Policy   Construction   Defence   Economy   Electricity   Energy   Environment   ICT   Metals   Mining   Science and Technology   Services   Trade   Transport & Logistics   Water  
What's On Press Office Tenders Suppliers Directory Research Jobs Announcements Letters Contact Us
 
 
 
RSS Feed
Article   Comments   Other News   Research   Magazine  
 
 
Nov 17, 2009

Ford introduces inflatable seat belts

Back
The inflatable seat belt passed several tests before it will now be introduced in the new Ford Explorer. Source: Ford Motor Company
 
 
 
Construction|Engineering|Gas|Safety|System|Systems|Testing|Energy|Systems|Environmental
Construction|Engineering|Gas|Safety|System|Systems|Testing|Energy|Systems|Environmental
construction|engineering|gas|safety|system|systems-company|testing|energy|systems|environmental
© Reuse this



US vehicle manufacturer Ford is bringing to market the world’s first inflatable seat belts, combining attributes of traditional seat belts and air bags to provide what the company describes as “an added level of crash safety protection for rear-seat occupants”.

The restraint system is designed to help reduce head, neck and chest injuries for rear-seat passengers.

Ford will introduce inflatable rear seat belts on the next-generation Ford Explorer, which goes into production next year for the North American market. 

Over time, the automaker plans to offer the technology in all of its vehicles globally.

“Ford’s rear inflatable seat belt technology will enhance safety for rear-seat passengers of all ages, especially for young children who are more vulnerable in crashes,” says Ford sustainability, environmental and safety engineering group vice-president Sue Cischke.

She says advances in air bag inflation and seat-belt construction methods have enabled Ford and its suppliers to develop the seat belts, designed to deploy over a vehicle occupant's torso and shoulder in 40 milliseconds in the event of a crash.

In everyday use, the inflatable belts operate like conventional seat belts, and are safe and compatible with infant and children safety car and booster seats.

According to Ford’s research, more than 90% of those who tested the inflatable seat belts found them to be similar to, or more comfortable than a conventional belt, because they feel padded and softer. 

This comfort factor could help improve the 61% rear belt use rate in the US, which compares to 82% use by front-seat passengers, according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data.

HOW IT WORKS


In the event of a frontal or side crash, Ford says the inflatable belt’s increased diameter more effectively holds the occupant in the appropriate seating position, helping to reduce the risk of injury.

Vehicle safety sensors determine the severity of the collision, and deploy the inflatable belts’ air bags. 

Each belt’s tubular air bag inflates with cold compressed gas, which flows through a specially designed buckle from a cylinder housed below the seat. 

The inflatable belt’s accordion-folded bag breaks through the belt fabric as it fills with air, expanding sideways across the occupant’s body in about the same amount of time it takes a car travelling at highway speed to cover a metre in distance.

The use of cold compressed gas instead of a heat-generating chemical reaction – which is typical of traditional air-bag systems – means the inflated belts feel no warmer on the wearer’s body than the ambient temperature. 

The inflatable belts also fill at a lower pressure and a slower rate than traditional air bags, because the device does not need to close a gap between the belt and the occupant.

“It’s a very simple and logical system, but it required extensive trial and error and testing over several years to prove out the technology and ensure precise reliable performance in a crash situation,” says Ford research and advance engineering safety technical leader Srini Sundararajan.

The inflated belt helps distribute crash force energy across five times more of the occupant’s torso than a traditional belt, which expands its range of protection and reduces risk of injury by diffusing crash pressure over a larger area, while providing additional support to the head and neck. 

After deployment, the belt remains inflated for several seconds before dispersing its air through the pores of the air bag.

Edited by: Creamer Media Reporter
© Reuse this Comment Guidelines (150 word limit)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other Automotive News
 
Latest News
An end to wage negotiations within the local government sector could be in sight as a conciliator’s proposal, setting out a number of settlement suggestions to resolve the deadlock, was expected on Monday. The Independent Municipal and Allied Trade Union (Imatu)...
Development financier Eastern Cape Development Corporation (ECDC) executive Noludwe Ncokazi on Friday said the organisation had the “huge responsibility of ensuring business continuity”, following the resignation of ECDC subsidiary Automotive Industry Development...
South Africa’s second-largest oil refinery, Engen Refinery (Enref), is set to undergo a three-day planned maintenance outage from July 9 as part of an ongoing maintenance programme to ensure that the facility, which delivers a significant portion of South Africa’s...
More
 
 
Recent Research Reports
Real Economy Year Book 2015 (PDF Report)
There are very few beacons of hope on South Africa’s economic horizon. Economic growth is weak, unemployment is rising, electricity supply is insufficient to meet demand and/or spur growth, with poor prospects for many of the commodities mined and exported. However,...
Real Economy Insight: Automotive 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book comprises separate reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
Real Economy Insight: Water 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book has been divided into individual reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, coal, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
Real Economy Insight: Construction 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book has been divided into individual reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, coal, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
Real Economy Insight: Electricity 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book has been divided into individual reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, coal, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
Real Economy Insight: Road and Rail 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book has been divided into individual reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, coal, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
 
 
 
 
 
This Week's Magazine
NHLANHLA NENE The main constraints to economic growth are domestic
Finance Minister Nhlanhla Nene earlier this month stated that, while South Africa’s 2015 economic growth target of 2% was achievable, it was not enough to deliver the tax revenue needed to combat the country’s challenges.
The World Steel Association has published the 2015 edition of the World Steel in Figures report, which shows an increase in steel production as well as provides an overview of steel industry activities from crude steel production to apparent steel use.
The 25-year master plan for Gauteng’s Aerotropolis project will go through a process of approval and adoption during June and July, says Aerotroplis project manager Jack van der Merwe. “We are also in the process of putting together a special purpose vehicle (SPV) to...
SOLAR PANELS The existing buildings in the Coega Industrial Development Zone lent themselves well to rooftop solar panel installations
The Coega Development Corporation (CDC) plans to fit 15 of its buildings, totalling 127 000 m2 of roof space, in the Coega Industrial Development Zone (IDZ), in the Eastern Cape, with solar panels.
The Supreme Court of Appeal’s (SCA’s) November 2014 judgment, ordering steel producer ArcelorMittal South Africa (AMSA) to hand over the 2003 Environmental Master Plan for its Vanderbijlpark steel plant to environmental pressure groups, confirmed the right of civil...
 
 
Article contains comments
The e-tolls issue has gone way beyond rates, Wayne Duvenage of civil action group the Opposition to Urban Tolling Alliance (Outa) said on Thursday. "The (opposition against e-tolls in Gauteng) is not about the tariffs but more about the irrationality of the...
Article contains comments
It will take up to 18 months for government and the South African National Roads Agency Limited (Sanral) to implement the full spectrum of proposed tariff changes for users of Gauteng’s tolled freeways. While Sanral would, on Wednesday, implement the “first part” of...
Article contains comments
More
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alert Close
Embed Code Close
content
Research Reports Close
Research Reports are a product of the
Research Channel Africa. Reports can be bought individually or you can gain full access to all reports as part of a Research Channel Africa subscription.
Find Out More Buy Report
 
 
Close
Engineering News
Completely Re-Engineered
Experience it now. Click here
*website to launch in a few weeks
Subscribe Now for $96 Close
Subscribe Now for $96