http://www.engineeringnews.co.za
  SEARCH
Login
R/€ = 13.37Change: -0.35
R/$ = 11.97Change: -0.10
Au 1181.43 $/ozChange: -28.42
Pt 1138.00 $/ozChange: -22.50
 
 
Note: Search is limited to the most recent 250 articles. Set date range to access earlier articles.
Where? With... When?








Start
 
End
 
 
And must exclude these words...
Close Main Search
Close Main Login
My Profile News Alerts Newsletters Logout Close Main Profile
 
Agriculture   Automotive   Chemicals   Competition Policy   Construction   Defence   Economy   Electricity   Energy   Environment   ICT   Metals   Mining   Science and Technology   Services   Trade   Transport & Logistics   Water  
What's On Press Office Tenders Suppliers Directory Research Jobs Announcements Letters Contact Us
 
 
 
RSS Feed
Article   Comments   Other News   Research   Magazine  
 
 
Aug 10, 2012

CSIR says discretionary budget essential to long-term success

Back
Africa|Defence|Health|Industrial|Projects|Systems|Africa|South Africa|United Kingdom|Diagnostic Tools|Product|Service|Systems|Technology House Focusing|Infrastructure|Sibusiso Sibisi
Africa|Defence|Health|Industrial|Projects|Systems|Africa||Service|Systems||Infrastructure|
africa-company|defence|health|industrial|projects|systems-company|africa|south-africa|united-kingdom|diagnostic-tools|product|service|systems|technology-house-focusing|infrastructure|sibusiso-sibisi
© Reuse this



The discretionary budget of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) is key to the future success and sustainability of the organisation. “It allows us to do high-risk research, to maintain our existing capabilities and to develop new capabilities that will be required to address future challenges,” explains CSIR CEO Dr Sibusiso Sibisi. But it comprises less than 30% of the CSIR’s annual budget.

“The bulk of our income is for specific projects, against specific deliverables,” he elucidates. “It’s not just private-sector contracts. A lot of our public-sector income comes from contracts that support government service delivery challenges.” In fact, work for the private sector provides only a small part of the CSIR’s income, as do royalties from CSIR patents.

The biggest single income source is contracts with the public sector. And the CSIR expects that these contracts will grow considerably in value, becoming large-scale and even megascale progammes, such as the development of systems to make the proposed National Health Insurance work, as well as the development of related technologies, such as diagnostic tools for remote clinics.

“Our discretionary income from the public purse is now quite small, and in recent years has not grown much above inflation levels,” he points out. “It would be welcome if our discretionary component were to grow at a level above inflation. At the moment, we run the risk, as the discretionary budget declines, of becoming just a contract researcher, and not doing any proactive research that is required to address current and future challenges. We need the discretionary budget to continue to increase, so that we can continue to do the work that is not short-term. The CSIR risks becoming a technology house focusing solely on service delivery. This [service delivery] is important, but the long-term is also important. There is no other way to finance this [long-term research] except through the discretionary budget.”

Another concern is the need to be able to develop long-term budgets. “It’s not just how much money we have, but the predictability about it. Some things are long-term, like the development of new drugs,” he stresses. “We must be able to do ten-year planning, not three-year medium-term budgets. Not everything needs this [long-term approach] and we can’t hold anyone to ransom – the world economy can change. While in South Africa we do have reasonable predictability, we need longer-term predictability, especially in the biosciences where the realisation of the potential cutting edge technologies requires committed long-term investment. We need to give ourselves at least ten years to develop a product and fund it for those ten years. We’d review it periodically, of course, and ask hard questions on how it was going. But we’re not quite there, yet.”

Despite these concerns, over the past few years the CSIR has successfully strengthened its science base, in terms of both infrastructure and attracting and developing new, young staff and high profile experts. These had been issues of concern identified in reviews of the CSIR carried out in 1997 and 2003 (Sibisi was appointed CSIR CEO in 2002). “We’ve been working very hard on strengthening our science base while retaining good, sound, business practices,” he assures. “This is now all on track and going well. Perhaps we now can demonstrate more explicitly what the benefits are to South African society of science and technology.”

Given that South Africa has a dedicated Minister and Ministry of Science and Technology, Sibisi does not think that the country requires a dedicated Chief Scientific Adviser to government (as, for example, the UK has). “But there should be a way to allow scientific opinion to be raised at the highest level,” he says.

This issue has been taken up by an official advisory committee of the Minister of Science and Technology, which has recommended the creation of a statutory body to be called the National Council on Research and Innovation. This council would be chaired by the Deputy President, with the deputy chairperson being the Minister of Science and Technology, and it would be composed of 15 to 20 members, comprising representatives of the Academy of Science for South Africa and the various science councils, including the CSIR. However, it would, Sibisi suggests, be a good idea to copy and expand the British idea of a Chief Defence Scientist, having such a high-level scientific adviser not only in the Department of Defence but also in other departments, such as the Department of Health or the Department of Home Affairs.

Edited by: Creamer Media Reporter
© Reuse this Comment Guidelines (150 word limit)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other Science and Technology News
ACCIDENT PREVENTION Investing in dust surpression solutions can effectively reduce or eliminate air pollution at any materials-handling site
To prevent operational downtime that, on average, can result in a loss of between $1 000/h and $3 000/h, materials handling companies must invest in dust prevention solutions that effectively reduce or eliminate air pollution, says dust suppression engineering...
TREATED ROAD SURFACE Haul road surface treated with the Dust-A-Side bituminous-based product
International research, using human health and environment protection agency the US Environmental Protection Agency’s emissions factors for unpaved haul roads, indicates that haul trucks generate the most dust emissions from surface mining sites, accounting for...
TOTAL DUST MANAGEMENT 88Chemco uses appropriate chemistry for each project to ensure the solution fits performance and economic parameters
Dust-suppression solutions provider 88Chemco is saving costs for clients in the mining, oil and gas, and plantation industries with its chemical technologies and engineering methods, including fine-particle engineering, which was launched in July last year, says...
More
 
 
Latest News
Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk.
Clean energy leader Tesla Motors on Thursday night launched a new range of batteries that could power homes and commercial buildings at a fraction of the expected cost, highlighting the growing demand for the minerals such a s graphite, cobalt and lithium required to...
Eskom said load-shedding should not be needed this weekend. According to the bi-weekly System Status Bulletin‚ released on Thursday‚ the power utility “will once again embark on a massive plant maintenance drive this long-weekend in an effort to improve the...
With just hours to go before the Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBEE) Amended Codes of Good Practice come into law on 1 May‚ the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) had still not clarified several important points - including the draft Qualifying Small...
More
 
 
Recent Research Reports
 
 
 
 
This Week's Magazine
Mercedes-Benz will launch ten plug-in hybrid models by 2017, says the German automaker’s parent company, Daimler. Following the launch of the S 500 plug-in hybrid, March saw the introduction of the C 350 e, the second model to feature the drive-train concept. Under...
Energy Minister Tina Joemat-Pettersson's recent unveiling of something of a road map for an upscaled and accelerated deployment of independent power producer (IPP) capacity has been widely welcomed. Besides plans to accelerate and expand the hitherto successful...
South African Airways (SAA) acting CEO Nico Bezuidenhout has firmly denied reports that a stake in the airline was going to be sold to Air China. “Categorically, SAA is not in any talks with any airline to sell itself at the moment,” he stated at a media briefing at...
Russian State-owned nuclear group Rosatom has confirmed that it is in talks with Nigeria about the construction of nuclear power plants (NPPs) in that country, but has denied that any agreement has been signed. This follows a recent report in the Nigerian media that...
HANDIGAS LPG LPG users can order products at the Afrox website or through the Afrox call centre and receive next-day delivery
Gas products and services company Afrox has launched a pilot programme to deliver its range of Handigas liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) to domestic consumers to fill a gap in the market, thereby expanding its direct contact with end-users.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alert Close
Embed Code Close
content
Research Reports Close
Research Reports are a product of the
Research Channel Africa. Reports can be bought individually or you can gain full access to all reports as part of a Research Channel Africa subscription.
Find Out More Buy Report
 
 
Close
Engineering News
Completely Re-Engineered
Experience it now. Click here
*website to launch in a few weeks
Subscribe Now for $96 Close
Subscribe Now for $96