http://www.engineeringnews.co.za
  SEARCH
Login
R/€ = 18.12Change: 0.00
R/$ = 16.05Change: -0.03
Au 1189.06 $/ozChange: -6.39
Pt 931.00 $/ozChange: -5.50
 
 
Note: Search is limited to the most recent 250 articles. Set date range to access earlier articles.
Where? With... When?








Start
 
End
 
 
And must exclude these words...
Close Main Search
Close Main Login
My Profile News Alerts Newsletters Logout Close Main Profile
 
Agriculture   Automotive   Chemicals   Competition Policy   Construction   Defence   Economy   Electricity   Energy   Environment   ICT   Metals   Mining   Science and Technology   Services   Trade   Transport & Logistics   Water  
What's On Press Office Tenders Suppliers Directory Research Jobs Announcements Letters About Us
 
 
 
RSS Feed
Article   Comments   Other News   Research   Magazine  
 
 
Sep 07, 2012

Business schools should produce leaders who serve the greater good

Back
RIO DE JANEIRO|Africa|Education|Responsible Leadership|System|Africa|Brazil|South Africa|Solutions|Environmental|Angie Motshekga|Derick De Jongh|Dickson Masemola|Hendrik|Jacob Zuma|Talk Radio 702
|Africa|Education|System|Africa||Solutions|Environmental||
rio-de-janeiro|africa-company|education-company|responsible-leadership|system|africa|brazil|south-africa|solutions|environmental|angie-motshekga|derick-de-jongh|dickson-masemola|hendrik|jacob-zuma|talk-radio-702
© Reuse this



South Africa needs to embrace the respon- sibilities that come with the freedom and the rights it gained when the country became a democracy in 1994 and produce leaders who will not conform to dominant paradigms, but rather lead according to what society needs, says Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership director Professor Derick de Jongh.

He emphasises that South Africans need to take their responsibilities seriously by holding leaders accountable for their actions.

“Every single member of society, not just government, has to take responsibility for dealing with the freedom gained when South Africa became a democratic society. We need to look at each other and ask: what is needed to build this country?

“We love to criticise private and public leaders and, therefore, don’t focus on the important issues. South Africans need to develop a collective and collaborative understanding of the kind of leaders we need across all the sectors and to develop the next generation of leaders to tackle the issues at hand, instead of pointing fingers and making accusations,” states De Jongh.

He believes the voice of South Africa’s civil society is weak.

“When we were fighting against apartheid, civil society was not only powerful but was also supported internationally by various campaigns and movements.

“Civil unrest brought South Africa’s apartheid system to its knees. Now it seems as if South Africans do not have a strong enough cause to fight for and, instead, are fighting each other and blaming race for every challenge we face,” he states.

De Jongh warns that time is running out for South Africans to adapt to the responsibility of strengthening their newfound democracy.

“We need to face the challenges in our country and stop playing political games,” he adds, reflecting on President Jacob Zuma’s comments on the Limpopo textbook scandal during an interview with Talk Radio 702 presenter Redi Tlhabi on July 23.

The Department of Basic Education failed to deliver textbooks for school learners in Limpopo.

Zuma told Tlhabi that Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga could not be held accountable for the Limpopo textbook scandal, noting that the education problems in Limpopo were, rather, rooted in apartheid.

“What is happening today is what [former Prime Minister Hendrik] Verwoerd did, where the black majority were historically not given an education,” he added.

Many people have called for the resignation of Motshekga and Limpopo Education MEC Dickson Masemola.

De Jongh, however, highlights that public and private leaders who have responsibilities and fail to live up to them, should be held accountable and civil society needs to ensure that accountability.

He notes that the biggest challenge South Africa has to overcome is in developing the next generation of public and business leaders.

“Business schools have a big role to play in this,” he adds.

“Some business schools are still developing leaders who will maximise the dominant economic paradigm, instead of developing well-balanced leaders who will uphold the best interests of society,” De Jongh states.

The ideological interests of political parties and private companies seem to receive more emphasis than the pressing societal issues, which may not be in the best interest of the country as a whole, he adds.

Businesses mainly operate within the economic paradigm, says De Jongh. “There is a fundamental need for business schools to ask whether everything they are teaching students is still relevant to what we as a country need today.”

Business schools, therefore, need to produce leaders who can find a balance between making a profit and serving the greater good – leaders who can look beyond purely economic motives to what success and progress actually means, the centre states.

A shift from the economic paradigm towards social and environmental responsibility, as well as good corporate governance, needs to occur in the public and the private sectors, De Jongh emphasises.


To address global leadership issues, the University of Pretoria-based Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership in 2010 collaborated with business schools worldwide, investigating a more radical vision for management education.

This resulted in the formation of the 50+20 initiative, which was presented at the Rio+20 Earth Summit 2012, held in Rio de Janeiro, in Brazil, where 50+20 argued for a global mind shift away from the current management-education perspective.

“We are looking critically at what we are teaching Master of Business Administration graduates and whether it is still relevant in light of current global challenges,” De Jongh states.

In addition, the Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership offers a leadership development intervention called the Respon- sible Leadership programme, which encourages courageous conversations in driving collaborative action in support of social and environmental justice.

“Programme participants are highly talented individuals working in the public, private and civil society,” the centre explains.

The Responsible Leadership programme will be presented over two days in partnership with software developer Microsoft South Africa, The Gordon Institute of Business Science and the Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership.

“This course is the first of its kind in South Africa with the first intake of participants from October 18.

With this programme, we aim to develop alternatives to the current economic paradigm and find solutions in assisting to produce responsible, well-balanced leaders for the future of South Africa,” says De Jongh.

Edited by: Chanel de Bruyn
Creamer Media Senior Deputy Editor Online
© Reuse this

To subscribe email subscriptions@creamermedia.co.za or click here
To advertise email advertising@creamermedia.co.za or click here
 
Comment Guidelines (150 word limit)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other Labour and Skills Development News
Updated 7 hours ago While international companies are keen to invest in South Africa, they are unable to meet the conditions of employment that have been extended to non-parties, forming part of a myriad of reasons why the the Free Market Foundation (FMF) is challenging the current...
Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa
Government is certain it will reach agreement with the Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu) on the minimum wage and other issues, Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa said on Sunday. He was addressing hundreds of African National Congress supporters at the old...
SUE JANSE VAN VUUREN corporate risk manger at Air Products South Africa
Gas products supplier Air Products South Africa has, over a number of years, developed a formal occupational health and safety (OHS) programme, which has proven effective, and has gained recognition in the health and safety industry. The safety programme involves not...
More
 
 
Latest News
Updated 7 hours ago While international companies are keen to invest in South Africa, they are unable to meet the conditions of employment that have been extended to non-parties, forming part of a myriad of reasons why the the Free Market Foundation (FMF) is challenging the current...
South Africa- and Botswana-based research institutions have teamed up to research dynamic spectrum access and the sharing of television (TV) band frequencies using a TV white space (TVWS) experimental network. South Africa’s Council for Scientific and Industrial...
Randgold CEO Mark Bristow
Mining companies owed it to their host countries and their shareholders to invest in the troughs so that they could reap the benefits in the peaks, Randgold Resources CEO Dr Mark Bristow said on Tuesday. Speaking during a panel discussion at the 2016 Investing in...
More
 
 
Recent Research Reports
Construction 2016: A review of South Africa's construction industry (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Construction 2016 Report examines South Africa’s construction industry over the past 12 months. The report provides insight into the business environment; key participants; local demand; geographic diversification; corporate activity; black economic...
Energy Roundup – February 2016 (PDF Report)
The February 2016 roundup covers activities across South Africa for December 2015 and January 2016 and includes details of a Government Gazette notice that confirms Cabinet’s decision to move ahead with the 9 600 MW nuclear procurement programme; State-owned power...
Energy Roundup - December 2015 (PDF Report)
The December 2015 roundup includes details of State-owned utility Eskom’s application to claw back R22.8-billion; South Africa’s ranking as an investment destination for renewable energy; and a nuclear expert’s thoughts on reactor designs for South Africa’s nuclear...
Water 2015: A review of South Africa's water sector (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Water 2015 Report considers the aforementioned issues, not only in the South African context but also in the African and global context in terms of supply and demand, water stress and insecurity, and access to water and sanitation, besides others.
Input Sector Review: Pumps 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s 2015 Input Sector Review on Pumps provides an overview of South Africa’s pumps industry with particular focus on pump manufacture and supply, aftermarket services, marketing strategies, local and export demand, imports, sector support, investment...
Liquid Fuels 2015: A review of South Africa's liquid fuels sector (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Liquid Fuels 2015 Report examines these issues in the context of South Africa’s business environment; oil and gas exploration; fuel pricing; the development of the country’s biofuels industry; the logistics of transporting liquid fuels; and...
 
 
 
 
 
This Week's Magazine
Power and automation company ABB is in the launch phase of its highest payload, multipurpose industrial robot, the IRB 8700. The robot has a reach of 3.5 m and can handle a payload of up to 800 kg. “When designing the IRB 8700, we emphasised reach and payload, as...
Identity and Access Management (IAM) is a critical facet of a connected security ecosystem, as controlling the confidentiality, integrity and authorisation of data access and use is key to securing new digital business channels. However, companies face several...
RORY YOUNG Managed security services provide companies with a means to actively monitor their environment and ward against threats
Data underpins digital business models, the digital economy, the Internet of Things and the fundamental changes in the ways people interact and protecting data is crucial to securing new ways of doing business, says T-Systems South Africa information and...
The City of Cape Town will issue a tender for the procurement of electric buses for its MyCiTi service, in line with the council’s commitment to lower its carbon footprint, says executive mayor Patricia de Lille. The tender, to be advertised early in February, will...
The iSimangaliso Wetland Park Authority signed a R10-million contract last month with local tailings storage facility specialists Cyclone Engineering Projects to remove about 100 000 m3 of dredge spoil obstructing the natural course of the uMfolozi river, in...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alert Close
Embed Code Close
content
Research Reports Close
Research Reports are a product of the
Research Channel Africa. Reports can be bought individually or you can gain full access to all reports as part of a Research Channel Africa subscription.
Find Out More Buy Report
 
 
Close
Engineering News
Completely Re-Engineered
Experience it now. Click here
*website to launch in a few weeks
Subscribe Now for $149 Close
Subscribe Now for $149