http://www.engineeringnews.co.za
  SEARCH
Login
R/€ = 14.95Change: -0.03
R/$ = 13.27Change: 0.04
Au 1141.82 $/ozChange: 8.07
Pt 1012.00 $/ozChange: 0.00
 
 
Note: Search is limited to the most recent 250 articles. Set date range to access earlier articles.
Where? With... When?








Start
 
End
 
 
And must exclude these words...
Close Main Search
Close Main Login
My Profile News Alerts Newsletters Logout Close Main Profile
 
Agriculture   Automotive   Chemicals   Competition Policy   Construction   Defence   Economy   Electricity   Energy   Environment   ICT   Metals   Mining   Science and Technology   Services   Trade   Transport & Logistics   Water  
What's On Press Office Tenders Suppliers Directory Research Jobs Announcements Letters Contact Us
 
 
 
RSS Feed
Article   Comments   Other News   Research   Magazine  
 
 
Nov 25, 2011

25/11/2011 (On-The-Air)

Back
safmpod_25112011
 
 
 
DRC|Engineering|Africa|Aluminium|Building|Concrete|Diesel|DIESEL ENGINES|Engines|Environment|Eskom|Flow|Hydropower|Mining|Namibia|rail|Storage|Transnet|transport|Trucks|Turbines|Waste|Water|Africa|Democratic Republic Of Congo|DRC|Automotive|Energy|Flow|Logistics|Products|Steel|Power|Turbines|Waste|Diesel
DRC|Engineering|Africa|Aluminium|Building|Concrete|Diesel|DIESEL ENGINES|Engines|Environment|Eskom|Flow|Hydropower|Mining|Namibia|rail|Storage|Transnet|transport|Trucks|Turbines|Waste|Water|Africa|Democratic Republic Of Congo|DRC|Automotive|Energy|Flow|Logistics|Products|Steel|Power|Turbines|Waste|
drc|engineering|africa-company|aluminium|building|concrete|diesel-company|diesel-engines|engines|environment|eskom|flow-company|hydropower|mining|namibia|rail|storage|transnet|transport|trucks|turbines-company|waste-company|water|africa|democratic-republic-of-congo|drc-country|automotive|energy|flow-industry-term|logistics|products|steel|power|turbines-person|waste|diesel
© Reuse this



Every Friday morning, SAfm’s AMLive’s radio anchor Xolani Gwala speaks to Martin Creamer, publishing editor of Engineering News and Mining Weekly. Reported here is this Friday’s At the Coalface transcript:

Gwala: Hopes of generating massive amounts of clean electricity from Central Africa are being rekindled.

Creamer: You know the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has the Congo River and the Inga site. This is the most prolific hydroelectric power site in the world. There is nothing to touch it. I mean we could easily get out of Inga as much power as we are getting out of Eskom at the moment, from the ‘Grand Inga’ site, but it would be clean.

This is hydropower so you wouldn’t have the carbon element and, of course, it has also got to be affordable and that is going to be the trick. Because of COP 17 where they will be talking about climate change within the United Nations framework in Durban starting on Monday, they have shaken the dust off this whole plan of ‘Grand Inga’ again.

Our own Minister of Energy Dipuo Peters has gone up to Lubumbashi together with President Jacob Zuma and President Joseph Kabila of the DRC and they have signed a new memorandum of understanding for ‘Grand Inga’. This Inga they have been talking about since the Sixties. It is a magnificent possibility to create clean electricity for Africa and even Southern Europe.

There is just such a huge potential, 39 000 MW and beyond. They are even talking about 50 000 MW from this flowing river. In parts of it this river flows so vigorously that you don’t even need to build a dam wall, you can put the turbines in the water and you can get your power generated.

Gwala: If they have been talking about this since the sixties what has stopped them from proceeding with the plan?

Creamer: The biggest thing is country risk. You know, the DRC is seen as high risk and this is going to be high capital. There is also a need for agreements around the country.

We had Wescor, which South Africa did with Namibia and a lot of other Southern African countries, to create the transmission network in the meantime, because it is going to need enormous transmission carrying all that power down through Africa to the south, north and which ever way you want to go. We even abandoned that, because there was a complaint about inclusivity.

They seem to have remoulded the model now with this new memorandum of understanding and it seems that there is a new focus on it ahead of COP 17. I just hope that they can get moving from the paper work to concrete.

Gwala: Talking about COP 17. South Africans need to recycle more as part of our response to combating climate change.

Creamer: COP 17 starting Monday. There is going to be heady discussions, intellectual discussions all about how to mitigate climate change and carbon footprints, carbon capture and storage and all that sort of intellectual stuff. But, what about on the ground, what can we do at a micro level? People are saying that manufacturers need to come in to play now.

To be encouraged or even forced to make products that can be repaired, reused, refilled. Look at a mine these days when you go, before you can dig in that ground you have got to give the governments of the world financial guarantees, which the governments hold that you will rehabilitate that.

You will fix it once your done. But what do manufactures around the world do? They have got no obligations, they flood the market with products that end up on waste dumps and nobody does anything about it. That is a huge rehabilitation cost to municipalities.

People are saying now particularly with COP 17 environment that we should start formulating some micro-activity that can lead to better climate change mitigation and go into remanufacturing, which is a process that you disassemble, clean, repair and reuse former used products in new products. The only way we see it now is in the automotive industry. For some time now there has been a remanufacture of petrol and diesel engines for light commercial and passenger vehicles.

Other than that, there has been no sort of obligation besides the automotive industry of getting away from this throw-away society that we have, which a fortune ends up on the dumps and someone else’s responsibility. We have got vast quantities of plastic and I’m talking about not just the recycling end of it.

You must repair, reuse, refill and reuse again before you start the recycling, that must be at the end of the line. This is something, as we head for COP 17, that I think can be encouraged at government level and at micro-level where there are corporations involved, but it will need some sort of stimulation or enforcement.

Gwala: The Russian company Renova is keen to invest more in South Africa.

Creamer: Renova, we don’t know much about it, but it is a quite a big Russian company. It is one of the top ten private oil producers and one of the biggest aluminium producers in the world, headed by Victor Vekselberg. It has been dipping its toe in investment in South Africa. It has begun with mining manganese in the Kalahari, where it has done very well with a black-empowerment partner Magestic Silver Trading, which has actually got control of the mine.

Renova being wise in taking 49%, but it gets that flow of manganese for its Transalloys smelter. It is also smelting the manganese. We have been doing it in the Mpumalanga area for many years, but the Russians have taken over this. It used to be owned by Anglo American through Highveld Steel.

Then Roman Abramovich, the owner of Chelsea Football Club, he then bought Highveld Steel in Mpumalanga and one of the peripheral items was Transalloys then along came Victor Vekselberg and he bought that Transalloys, which falls under the Renova umbrella. Now we see Renova wanting to do much more at Transalloys, even building a sinter plant.

They are also saying that to smelt in South Africa you need energy, so they want to possibly start generating electricity as an independent power producer, but in a very clean way, solar power, because they want to do it in the Kalahari. They are also the owners of a Swiss company that manufactures thin-film solar panels.

They want to put all that together and try and get enough electricity for themselves at their smelter, but also feed it into the Eskom grid as an IPP. Then, why they are looking at sintering, is to try and mitigate their logistics costs, because they are finding that they might have to put a million metric tons of manganese on to trucks, because they can’t get it on to rail this year.

o mitigate that they want to add value through the sintering plant possibility at Transalloys in Mpumalanga, but at the same time they are offering through the South African Russian Business Council some sort of interface between our Transnet and the State-owned Russian railways there. Perhaps they can do something together to augment the heavy haul line they want to build to Coega or any other line that assists with manganese transport in which Renova, the Russian company wants to increase its involvement in South Africa.

Gwala: Thanks very much. Martin Creamer is publishing editor of Engineering News and Mining Weekly, he’ll be back with us at the same time next week.

Edited by: Creamer Media Reporter
© Reuse this Comment Guidelines (150 word limit)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other SAFM
South Africans once mighty gold mining companies are preparing for worst-case scenarios. A major effort is being made to get cargo off the roads and back on to rail using a new app. The full weight of legislation is being thrown behind South Africa’s new...
More
 
 
Latest News
Koeberg unit 2 will be shut down on Monday August 31 for scheduled refuelling and maintenance and is expected to return back to service by mid-December 2015, Eskom said late Monday afternoon. The scheduled shutdown of Koeberg unit 2 is part of Eskom’s overall...
South Africa is set to play host to Africa’s first international renewable-energy conference, providing a platform to showcase the continent’s numerous renewable-energy projects to high-level international delegates, in Cape Town, from October 4 to 7. The South...
More
 
 
Recent Research Reports
Defence 2015: A review of South Africa's defence sector (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Coal 2015 report examines South Africa’s coal industry with regards to the business environment, the key participants in the sector, local demand, export sales and coal logistics, projects being undertaken by the large and smaller participants in the...
Real Economy Year Book 2015 (PDF Report)
There are very few beacons of hope on South Africa’s economic horizon. Economic growth is weak, unemployment is rising, electricity supply is insufficient to meet demand and/or spur growth, with poor prospects for many of the commodities mined and exported. However,...
Real Economy Insight: Automotive 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book comprises separate reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
Real Economy Insight: Water 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book has been divided into individual reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, coal, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
Real Economy Insight: Construction 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book has been divided into individual reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, coal, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
Real Economy Insight: Electricity 2015 (PDF Report)
Creamer Media’s Real Economy Year Book has been divided into individual reports under the banner Real Economy Insight and investigates key developments in the automotive, construction, electricity, road and rail, steel, water, coal, gold, iron-ore and platinum sectors.
 
 
 
 
 
This Week's Magazine
Training company The Intelligence Transfer Centre will host the fourth yearly Environmental Crimes Conference at the Indaba Hotel, in Fourways, Johannesburg between September 9 and 10. Confirmed key regulatory bodies that will attend the event include the Department...
The government of Egypt has said it is ready to provide technical assistance to Malawi in the development of the Shire–Zambezi waterway, which is designed to link landlocked Malawi to the Indian Ocean by opening the two rivers for navigation. Egyptian ambassador to...
Kenya is finally set to start building a new multipurpose petroleum pipeline, after securing a $350-loan from a consortium of banks, including South Africa's Rand Merchant Bank. The other banks in the consortium are the Cooperative Bank of Kenya, Citibank's Kenya...
MARAIS VAN HEERDEN The owner/operator should be able to view the overall project design and progress made at any time
Three-dimensional (3D) engineering design models can now be viewed on tablets, which enable stakeholders to view the design without having to buy the design software used to create it, says engineering design firm 3DDraughting executive Marais van Heerden. The...
Ford’s newest offering in a long list of newcomers to the local market in the last two years is the B-Max multi-activity vehicle (MAV). The B-Max will play in the so called B-MAV segment, or the small MAV segment, currently dominated by Toyota’s Avanza, which sells...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alert Close
Embed Code Close
content
Research Reports Close
Research Reports are a product of the
Research Channel Africa. Reports can be bought individually or you can gain full access to all reports as part of a Research Channel Africa subscription.
Find Out More Buy Report
 
 
Close
Engineering News
Completely Re-Engineered
Experience it now. Click here
*website to launch in a few weeks
Subscribe Now for $96 Close
Subscribe Now for $96